History of May Day

April 20, 2015

The first of May 1886 saw strikes and protests in the U.S. for an eight-hour work day.    In Chicago, the struggle resulted in workers being locked-out at a harvesting machine plant. Police broke up a demonstration by firing on the protesters.
The following day, May 4th, 1886 at a rally against the police violence someone threw a bomb at the police line killing several officers. The police returned gun
fire and arrested seven anarchists and labour activists.  They were charged on evidence that is still disputed today and convicted for murder.  Four of the
convicted, known as the Haymarket martyrs, were executed on Nov. 11, 1887.

In 1889, at the first congress of the Second International, delegates called for workers to launch demonstrations to commemorate the Haymarket affair
and to continue on May 1, 1890,  the struggle for the eight-hour day .  They said       “the workers of the various nations shall organization the demonstration in a manner suited to conditions in their country.

The resolution for May Day action was more cautious, urging only that “the workers of the various nations shall organization the demonstration in a manner  suited to conditions in their country.”

“May Day captured the imagination of workers around the world who transformed the traditional spring festivities into a manifestation of working-class power.   It flourished in North America before World War I, but was largely abandoned during the 1920s.

May Day become more complicated to separate from communism when the Soviet Union made it a statutory holiday after the 1917 revolution. Which resulted in  several governments trying to tame it.  Nazi Germany made May 1 a “National Day of Labour” in 1933, and banned unions the following day. France tried to reshape  it as a day of national unity rather than workers’ solidarity, while Fascist Italy banned celebrations.

In North America, May Day was claimed by workers in the 1930s and 1940s,  it declined during the Cold War, and was largely displaced by peace marches and events in  the 1960s.   In the 1970s and 80s May day regained some of its importance as Canadian and U.S. governments attacked the labour movement and the working class.

Workers created both Labour Day and May Day with both days being born of repression. Both days have been used and recast over the years.  A great suggestion  was that perhaps we might celebrate Labour Day as a reminder of what labour has won, and mark May Day in anticipation of what we still need to do.

Comments

Want to contribute? Leave a comment!