May Day

April 8, 2015

May Day celebrated on the first of the month was before 1752 celebrated from April 28th to May 3.

The celebration has its origin in the Roman festival of Flora, goddess of  flowers and fruit. It  marked the beginning of summer.

Some of the traditions practiced back then were quite interesting. Young girls got up before sunrise to wash their faces in the early morning dew believing it would make them beautiful for the following year.  I wonder how many would do that today?

Herrick, a 17th century English poet wrote:

There’s not a budding boy, or girl, this day,

But is got up, and gone to bring in May.

Flowers were gathered in the early morning and used to decorate homes with the belief that it would bring good fortune to the household.

To celebrate trees were cut and trimmed to make May poles.  Villagers would dance around the poles celebrating the end of winter and the beginning of planting time.

In Halifax

I remember dancing around a Maypole fixed with long beautiful coloured ribbons.  Each young student held the end of a ribbon and we danced around the pole weaving the ribbons together as we danced.  Prior to the day we all made beautiful garlands which we wore that day.  I remember it always as being a bright sunshine day when we all young students danced along Brunswick street to our destination… St. Patrick’s Church.  It was always fun.

I can’t remember when we stopped celebrating Mayday but history holds that information.

Comments

Want to contribute? Leave a comment!