Scots and Education

August 6, 2009

According to English Historian G, M. Trevelyan, by the beginning of the 18th century Scots were the best educated people in Europe
In Canada Scots founded 5 out of 6 colleges which became:
The University of New Brunswick,
Kings College in Nova Scotia,
McGill University
University of Toronto and
Dalhousie University

Lord Dalhousie

Dalhousie University was founded by Lord Dalhousie in 1818. The curriculum was based on the curriculum and teaching methods used at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Thomas McCulloch became the first president of Dalhousie. Under McCulloch In 1841 Dalhousie was granted university status.

John Strachan

Established the first grammar schools in Upper Canada.
Sir John William Dawson

University of New Brunswick was founded in part by Sir John William Dawson a Canadian born of Scots heritage.
Thomas McCulloch
Thomas McCulloch, a Presbyterian minister, founded Pictou Academy, Nova Scotia in 1816. He modeled the curriculum on Scottish universities.
Lord Dalhousie
Dalhousie University was founded by Lord Dalhousie in 1818. The curriculum was based on the curriculum and teaching methods used at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.
Thomas McCulloch became the first president of Dalhousie. Under McCulloch In 1841 Dalhousie was granted university status.
DAWSON, SIR JOHN WILLIAM
University of New Brunswick was founded in most part by Sir John William Dawson a Canadian born of Scots heritage.
FORRESTER, MAUREEN
Musician
FRAZER, SIR JAMES GEORGE
1854, 1 January Scholar and anthropologist, Sir James George Frazer, was born in Glasgow. He was educated in classical studies at Glasgow and Cambridge universities, and in 1879 he became a fellow at the latter. Fraser was knighted in 1914, awarded the British Order of Merit in 1925, and died in Cambridge on May 7, 1941.

Sir James George Frazer blended Sir Edward Tylor’s Primitive Culture comparative method with his own to study ancient customs by examining modern people living on a primitive level. He did not do fieldwork but rather spent considerable time doing library research in obtaining ethnographic information from the accounts of travelers, missionaries, and officials. His great work, written in Victorian style, was The Golden Bough, a study of religion and magic that popularized anthropology was published in 1890. His later works include Totemism and Exogamy (1910), Folklore in the Old Testament (1923), and Man, God and Immortality (1927)

MacEachern, Angus
Born in Scotland in 1759 died 1835 immigrated to P.E.I. in 1790
He was the irst Bishop of Charlottetown, P.E.I. 1831 He established St. Andrew’s College in PEI for seminarians

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