The Halifax Explosion

December 6, 2014

December 6, 1917 dawned clear and sunny in Halifax.  At around 7:30 am the navy opened the gate in the nets at the entrance to the harbour. The second of several vessels headed up the harbour was the Mont-Blanc laden with explosives.

Around the same time, the Imo in Bedford Basin raised its anchor and headed toward the Narrows .  It increased its speed as it cleared the ships in the Basin.  And then, through the morning haze, Imo faced Mont-Blanc moving up the Narrows.  Mont-Blanc blew its whistle once, to say it had right of way and would maintain its course: Imo should move to the right. But Imo blew its whistle twice in reply–translation: I am staying where I am.

Followed by a rush of whistles between the two ships. And then at the last minute, the Mont-Blanc turned hard to the left as  Imo  at the same time reversed its engines hard astern.   At about 8:45, Imo’s prow struck the starboard bow of Mont-Blanc. It missed the hold carrying TNT but hit  the area carrying picric acid and benzol fuel. As the two vessels ground into each other, sparks flew.  The fire started almost immediately and rapidly grew causing a huge cloud of oily black smoke to envelope the deck.

Many people crowded the shore to watch the fire. After twenty minutes, the Mont-Blanc exploded and Halifax is “given a taste of hell.”

On the Mont-Blanc a column of gray-black smoke, with bursts of flame like fireworks inside it, rose high into the sky.  The french crew thinking the ship would blow up in minutes abandoned ship.  They were unable to speak English so no one understood their shouts as they rowed furiously for the Dartmouth side of the harbour. The blazing ship drifted up to Pier 6 on the  Halifax shoreline, and the fire spread to the pier’s wooden pilings.

the tugboat Stella Maris already in the area trained its fire hose on the burning ship but it made no difference. Then the tug’s skipper,  a Royal Navy officer,  decided to try towing Mont-Blanc away from the pier. But after two dangerous and unsuccesful attempts, they deliberated on what to do next, unaware that they were almost out of time.

Almost no one realized the danger not even the fire department. Firemen rushed to the scene as Mont-Blanc drifted towards shore.

At 9:04:35 Mont-Blanc exploded with a force stronger than any manmade explosion before it.   The explosion sent a white cloud billowing 20,000 feet above the city.  The steel hull burst sky-high, falling in a blizzard of red-hot, twisted projectiles on both sides of the harbour.   Part of the anchor hit the ground more than 4 kilometers away on the far side of the Northwest Arm. A gun barrel landed in Dartmouth more than 5 kilometers from the harbour.

For almost two square kilometers around Pier 6, nothing was left standing. Richmond was obliterated, rubbleon fire, the survivors try desperately to save the dying and the trapped. Rumours of another explosion drove rescuers to higher ground. The blast obliterated the towering sugar refinery, homes, and apartments . On the Dartmouth side, Tuft’s Cove took the brunt of the blast. The small Mi’kmaq settlement of Turtle Grove was obliterated.

Within minutes the blast provoked a tsunami that washed up as high as 18 meters above the harbour’s high-water mark on the Halifax side. It lifted Imo onto the Dartmouth shore. The ship stayed there until spring.

1,500 people dead, and more dying. 9,000 injured. More than 13,000 homes and businesses damaged ; 6000 people completely homeless.  Boston sent out a train filled with doctors, nurses, and volunteers to help the people of Halifax an Dartmouth through the desaster.   It must have seemed like an overwhelming job, but Halifax and Dartmouth began to rebuild. From the search for those at faut to the steady progress of rebirth, the city moved on, and most people tried to forget.

Comments

Want to contribute? Leave a comment!